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Nebraska Renovator Settles Lead Case

Thursday, January 10, 2013

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A Nebraska window and siding contractor will pay a $6,188 fine to settle allegations that it violated federal lead-paint disclosure rules, under a new settlement agreement.

In March 2011, Albracht Perma-Siding and Window Company failed to notify an Omaha couple about lead-based paint hazards before it or its subcontractors performed renovation work at their pre-1978 home, the Environmental Protection Agency said.

lead paint
EPA

Federal law requires contractors to alert owners and occupants to health risks associated with lead exposure before beginning renovation work.

The company also failed to keep records of lead-safe work practices used in jobs at 10 pre-1978 homes in Lincoln, Kennard, Bellevue and Omaha, NE, in 2010 and 2011, the federal agency said.

The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

No Pamphlet, No Records

Albracht or its subcontractors were legally required to provide owners and occupants of the properties with an EPA-approved lead hazard information pamphlet before beginning renovation work at the properties, according to the administrative consent agreement filed by EPA Region 7 in Lenexa, KS.

The window and siding company was also required to maintain records of required lead-safe work practices performed at the properties, EPA said.

Established in 1938, the family-owned home-improvement company installs permanent siding, new decks, roofs, gutter systems and replaces windows and doors, according to the company's website.

Lead-based Paint Disclosure Rule

Disseminating the lead hazard information pamphlet to property owners and occupants is one requirement of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, which Congress passed in 1992 as an amendment of the federal Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

The law requires renovators of such properties to obtain certified training, follow safe work practices, and comply with record-keeping requirements. Moreover, renovators are also required to take specific steps to make owners and occupants aware of health risks associated with lead exposure before renovation work occurs.

The regulation is intended to protect owners and occupants of residential properties, child care facilities and schools built before 1978 from health risks associated with lead-based paint.

Most homes built before 1978 contain some amount of lead-based paint, and subsequent renovation activity of such properties can cause occupants to be exposed to dust, chips and debris that contain lead.

   

Tagged categories: EPA; Health and safety; Lead; Regulations; Renovation; Windows

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