Durability + Design
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on LinkedIn Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Visit the TPC Store
Search the site

 

D+D News

Main News Page


Canadian Companies to Use Waste in Cement

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

More items for Good Technical Practice

Comment | More

Concrete is being mixed with the residuals of water filtration in Vancouver in order to address environmental impact concerns, as well as meet sustainability goals.

Lafarge Canada Inc., a concrete and aggregate manufacturer, and Metro Vancouver have brokered a three-year agreement, according to Lafarge, that involves using the residuals (left over from the filtration of drinking water) in cement manufacturing.

Residual Removal and Concrete Creation

During the water filtration process, solid residuals are removed, according to Lafarge. The chemical composition of these sediments—which are naturally occurring elements and treatment chemicals—forms something akin to red shale, one of the virgin aggregates used in the creation of concrete. These residuals take on a wet, clay-like appearance.

Lafarge Canada Inc.

During the water filtration process, solid residuals are removed, according to Lafarge. The chemical composition of these sediments—which are naturally occurring elements and treatment chemicals—forms something akin to red shale, one of the virgin aggregates used in the creation of concrete.

"Every year the filtration plant pulls between 8,000 and 10,000 tons of sediment and organic matter out of the water from the reservoirs," said Laurie Ford, Metro’s residuals management program manager, in an interview earlier this year.

After an initial successful trial period in May, Lafarge found that it could replace 2,100 tons of red shale, which the company would otherwise mine, with the residuals, and that the residuals did not create any emissions problems at the plant.

Prior to the trial, the Seymour-Capilano Filtration Plant would send 250 truckloads of water filtration residuals to the Vancouver Landfill every year. Instead, those same truckloads are now being sent to be part of the concrete manufacturing process.

The process means means fewer virgin minerals will need to be mined, and residuals will be kept out of landfills.

Company Agreement and Sustainability Goals

As part of LafargeHolcim’s Global 2030 Sustainability Plan, there is a call for the increased use of resources derived from the production of waste to be used in the company’s manufacturing processes. In the agreement with Metro Vancouver, Lafarge will produce a minimum of 10,000 tons of residual-added concrete per year.

Metro Vancouver/Lafarge Water Residuals for Cement Project from Metro Vancouver on Vimeo.

“We are very excited to be working with Lafarge on this innovative project, which uses residuals as a product, while reducing our overall environmental impact,” said Darrell Mussatto, chair of Metro Vancouver’s utilities committee, in a statement. “Our goal is to recover valuable resources from our utilities, and this project aligns perfectly with what we are hoping to achieve.”  

   

Tagged categories: concrete; Lafarge North America; Sustainability

Comment from M. Halliwell, (8/15/2017, 11:08 AM)

Great idea for re-use. I know wastewater treatment residuals (sludge) is being used as fertilizer in some jurisdictions and that recycling of street sweepings is also being done these days...all great ways to get more green and better use resources. On the coatings side, it will be interesting to see if the different material has any impact on coating/staining/polishing of the concrete.


Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.

Advertisements
 
Novatek Corporation
 
Novatek Portable Air Filtration Systems
 
Air Scrubbers/Negative Air machines for restoration, abatement, dust & odor control, hazardous contaminant removal from job sites to clean rooms and hospitals. Portable, affordable!
 

 
Shield Industries, Inc
 
FireGuard® E-84 Intumescent Coating - Shield Industries, Inc
 
Trust the certified protection of the industry’s most innovative intumescent coating FireGuard® E-84 to provide you with the 1 and 2 hour fire ratings you need.
 

 
Keim Mineral Coatings
 
Mineral Silicate Paints + Stains Fuse to Concrete
 
• Forms permanent chemical bonds
• Becomes part of the concrete
• Will never peel
• Looks completely natural
 

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@durabilityanddesign.com


The Technology Publishing Network

Durability + Design PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 

© Copyright 2012-2018, Technology Publishing Co., All rights reserved