Durability + Design
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on LinkedIn Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Visit the TPC Store
Search the site

 

D+D News

Main News Page


Plans for Commercial Lead Rule Return

Friday, May 30, 2014

More items for Maintenance + Renovation

Comment | More

After a hiatus of nearly two years, federal regulators are taking a baby step toward a new rule for controlling lead-paint hazards in commercial and public buildings.

Today (May 30), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is scheduled to publish “Framework for Identifying and Evaluating Lead-Based Paint Hazards from Renovation, Repair, and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings” in the Federal Register.

Historic restoration
AGC

Industry groups say the EPA has yet to identify whether "dangerous levels of lead" even exist in public and commercial buildings.

Pre-publication copies of the announcement and the Framework (which are not considered official until publication) were released Wednesday (May 28).

Expanding RRP

The agency is seeking public comments on the document through www.regulations.gov. The docket number is EPA-HQ-OPPT-2010-0173. The comment period runs for 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.

The Framework document serves as an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking; it is not a proposed rule.

The goal of the Framework is to "describe an approach for identifying and evaluating potential hazards created by renovations of public and commercial buildings," according to EPA.

The agency has been under pressure from contractors, builders, property owners and managers, and materials suppliers to document a problem before taking any action to expand the controversial Lead Safe Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) rule for residential and child-occupied facilities.

The RRP rule took effect in April 2010, and the EPA immediately announced plans to expand the mandates for lead-safe practices and certification to commercial and public-works construction.

The agency's RRP proposal for exterior renovations for public and commercial buildings was originally set to be issued by September 2012 and finalized in February 2014.

Dinosaur Monument
National Park Service

New lead rules for commercial and public buildings would affect renovation work such as the 2010 lead-paint removal project at Dinosaur National Monument.

Such a rule would potentially apply to workers and companies involved in building construction, specialty trades, real estate and other "general governmental support."

Critics Weigh In

Opponents, however, said EPA needed to document a problem and all potential costs before unloading a new rule. The critics included EPA's own Office of Inspector General, which issued a report in July 2012 criticizing the agency's economic analysis of the original RRP rule.

In September 2012, EPA announced that it would delay expansion of the rule until July 2015.

In May 2013, 22 trade organizations, collectively called the “Commercial Properties Coalition,” submitted 61 pages of comments on the plan to expand the program. The industry demanded proof of a “hazard and causal link” between renovation work and lead-based paint in public and commercial buildings before EPA drafted a new rule.

Model Scenarios

Although not yet final, the pre-publication Framework signals a more incremental regulatory approach than the sweeping RRP rule, which applies to all child-occupied pre-1978 construction.
Commercial building
Gentletouch1954 / Wikimedia Common

The commercial building industry notes that commercial buildings cover a vast range of ages, styles, configurations and purposes. EPA says it will develop model renovation scenarios for various potential exposures.

This time, EPA said it would "model specific interior and exterior [public and commercial building] renovation scenarios that represent the broad range of exposure that can occur in P&CBs in order to evaluate whether adverse health effects could occur."
 
The scenarios will consider building size and configuration, duration of exposure, presence of children, and other factors. The Framework describes how such analyses might be performed and presents some preliminary results.
 
The agency also wants to know how the renovation of commercial and public buildings could affect nearby homes, schools and day-care centers.
 
Limitations and Next Steps
 
EPA notes that the Framework is drawn generally and does not include suggested modeling inputs and other details.
 
Such details will be informed by the public comments, the agency says, and reflected in the next round—which will also then be subject to public comment.

   

Tagged categories: Commercial Buildings; EPA; Government contracts; Historic Structures; Lead paint abatement; Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (LRRP); Public spaces; Renovation

Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.

Advertisements
 
Shield Industries, Inc
 
FireGuard® E-84 Intumescent Coating - Shield Industries, Inc
 
Trust the certified protection of the industry’s most innovative intumescent coating FireGuard® E-84 to provide you with the 1 and 2 hour fire ratings you need.
 

 
Keim Mineral Coatings
 
Mineral Silicate Paints + Stains Fuse to Concrete
 
• Forms permanent chemical bonds
• Becomes part of the concrete
• Will never peel
• Looks completely natural
 

 
Novatek Corporation
 
Novatek Portable Air Filtration Systems
 
Air Scrubbers/Negative Air machines for restoration, abatement, dust & odor control, hazardous contaminant removal from job sites to clean rooms and hospitals. Portable, affordable!
 

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@durabilityanddesign.com


The Technology Publishing Network

Durability + Design PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 

© Copyright 2012-2018, Technology Publishing Co., All rights reserved