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Perspectives on Project Photography, from the Experts

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2011

By Barbara Jacobs


More items for Color + Design

If you want to know more about the properties of paint, you go to the experts—the paint-store manager or a painting professional, right?

So who do you ask when you want to know more about photography, and specifically, about photography of interior design or decorating projects?

A professional photographer.

Any chance I have to offer information from other design professionals is a great opportunity to share material that is beyond—and usually very different from—my own experience.

The subject of photography is one that I personally enjoy, and appreciate. As with many designers, I’ve had reasonable success with my own photographs. However, there’s nothing like a professional—in any field—to get to the “next” level or, in fact, many levels up the scale from what we amateuers can do ourselves.  It’s one of those things: budget is always an issue, but in this case you also “get what you pay for.”

So, I am grateful for the permission from Boston-area photographer Lynne Damianos, of Damianos Photography, to be able to offer her selection of tips for getting ready to photograph an interior.

Some of her suggestions would seem to be obvious and logical. Others—like making sure trash cans or other objects located outside the building don’t become part of the picture, or hiding light-fixture cords—could be easily overlooked.

Interior Residential Photography Prep List

Architectural/interior photography is a careful balance of anticipating potential challenges, and adapting—before the challenges become problematic. Damianos Photography educates clients and property owners about how to prepare for photography to maximize their time on location. In this discussion, Lynne concentrates on interior residential photography.

Lynne’s checklist below is a great tool to use when planning your next photographic project so your photographer (or even you, yourself) can spend more time photographing and less time staging and cleaning.

Lynne Damianos

Photo courtesy of Lynne Damianos Photography.

Kitchen by David L. King Architects Inc.

Lynne Damianos’ Interior Residential Photography Prep List:

• Try to schedule photography the day after house cleaning occurs

• Walk through rooms to determine which to photograph and from which angle

• Turn on all lights and replace burned out bulbs

• Straighten artwork on walls

• Position all window shades and Venetian blinds to match

• Straighten drapes

• Remove excess knickknacks and family photographs (optional)

• Straighten furniture

• Hide light fixture cords

• Align furniture cushions and straighten pillows

• Straighten fringe on rugs

• Set place settings in dining room/kitchen

• Remove unwanted objects seen through windows (garbage cans, grill, shovels)

• Add light-colored logs to fireplace

Thank you, Lynne!

About the author

Architectural color consultant Barbara Jacobs is the originator of Barbara Jacobs Color and Design, a design and consultancy firm offering “integral color solutions for architecture, interiors and business.” She has been an IACC-accredited color consultant/designer since 2000 and an active member of IACC-NA (International Association of Color Consultants/Designers-NorthAmerica) since 1996, also serving as the newsletter editor for that organization.

Barbara has worked in the field of environmental color design since 1986. Her work has also included creating and installing decorative finishes in residential and commercial projects, consultation for product colors, and creating custom paint colors.

The website for Barbara Jacobs Color and Design is located at http://www.integralcolor.com; Barbara also can be contacted at bjacobs@integralcolor.com, 508-359-5753 or 508-472-8105.

ABOUT THE BLOGGER

Barbara Jacobs

Can we talk?...about color, that is. That’s our objective with this ongoing discussion—a Color Exchange, if you will—in this Durability + Design blog. Whether we know it or not, color affects all of us, in many ways. So let’s engage in this exchange and explore this mysterious and exciting subject of color, its effects, and its applications.

SEE ALL CONTENT FROM THIS CONTRIUBTOR

   

Tagged categories: Color; Design; Interior design

Comment from Chris Haught, (7/14/2011, 11:28 AM)

Great points, Thanks!


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