Achieving Long-Term Coating Service Life on Metallic and Non-Metallic Building Component Substrates
presented by Dr. Kurt Wood, Arkema
Thursday, May 22, 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Hall of Mirrors
Session: High Performance Architectural Coatings

The appropriate use of color distinguishes a structure from those nearby. For the building owner, maintaining building aesthetics and curb appeal in a low maintenance manner is imperative. One aspect of achieving and/or maintaining curb appeal is color retention.

Building on over 45 years of continuous Florida outdoor exposure history for PVDF-based coatings on metal, it is possible to quantitatively predict color retention for new waterborne fluoropolymer coatings, which are adapted for use over a diverse group of non-metallic substrates, such as fiberglass pultrusions, vinyl, and fiber cement. These waterborne coatings can be applied in a factory during the production of the exterior building component. The same type of aqueous fluoropolymer coatings are also easily applicable in field restoration or repair situations.

This paper explores the achievable decorative service life for coatings, on various metallic and non-metallic substrates using different resin and pigment technologies. Outdoor exposure and accelerated weathering performance data will be presented for coatings based on different resin and pigment technologies.

Learning Objectives:

To understand the ways that new waterborne PVDF hybrid technology overcomes some of the limitations of traditional "70%" PVDF solvent coatings.

To understand how the color retention lifetime of new PVDF-based formulations can be predicted based on outdoor and accelerated data for traditional PVDF solvent coatings.

To understand how the class of pigment affects the color retention lifetime.

To learn more about achievable decorative service life for coatings, on various metallic and non-metallic substrates using different resin and pigment technologies.


Speaker Bio:

Dr. Kurt Wood is a Principal Scientist at Arkema, Inc., near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He has worked in the polymers and coatings area since 1989, first with the Rohm and Haas Company, and with Arkema (formerly Atofina Chemicals) since 1996, where he is a group leader for KYNAR® PVDF coatings R&D. Areas of particular interest include waterborne coatings, crosslinking technologies, and weatherability prediction for coatings. He received a PhD. in Physical Chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley.