Durability + Design
 
About  |  Subscribe  |  Advertise  |  Connect 
Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook

 

Download our free ebook: Generic Architectural Coatings: Performance and Uses

D+D News

Main News Page


No Pulp Fiction: Bricks of Paper Waste

Monday, January 28, 2013

More items for Building Envelope

Comment | More

It may sound unappetizing, but a novel mix of clay, sludge, paper waste and ceramics is producing a new kind of insulating brick that holds potentially significant economic and environmental benefits.

Researchers at the University of Jaen in Spain are developing the material, which reuses recycled cellulous waste from a paper factory and sludge from the purification of its waste water. The mixture is then combined with clay and a ceramic construction material, and passed through a pressure and extrusion machine.

Bricks made from paper waste
Images, video: SINC

Researchers at the University of Jaen explain their process, which uses paper waste and ceramic construction material to make economical, insulating bricks.

The process (think sausage or Play-Doh) produces bricks with low thermal conductivity that act as good insulators, according to a video demonstration of the process, developed at the Upper Polytechnic School of Linares.

"The use of paper industry waste could bring about economic and environmental benefits as it means that material considered as waste can be reused as raw material," researchers reported.

Their work, "Recovering wastes from the paper industry: Development of ceramic materials," has been published in Fuel Processing Technology.

"Adding waste means that the end product has low thermal conductivity and is therefore a good insulator," explains Carmen Martínez, researcher at the University of Jaen, in a release by the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT). "In addition to the resulting benefit of using these bricks instead of their traditional counterparts made of traditional raw materials."
 
University of Jaen bricks

The team's pressure and extrusion manufacturing process is something like making sausage, or squeezing out Play-Doh logs.

Adding waste to the brick prototypes means that they provide energy due to their organic material content, researchers say. That could help to reduce fuel consumption and kiln time required for brick production.
 
Brick by Brick
 
The prototype brick is small—just 3 x 1 x 6 cm. But the team has also successfully been testing larger bricks, reports say.
 
"On the whole, this technique could bring about a saving in energy and raw materials for brick factories along with environmental benefits from the use of waste that is initially discarded,"  said Martínez.
 
The chief drawback of the prototypes (their "Achilles heel," according to FECYT) is their lower mechanical resistance compared to traditional bricks, "although this parameter is above the legal minimum," the foundation reports.
University of Jaen bricks

Researchers are working to strengthen the bricks' mechanical resistance.

In addition, "there are still a few problems to solve in the adherence and shaping of those pieces that have high percentages of paper waste," the foundation reports.
 
The team is thus tweaking its recipe with other products, including residues from the beer, olive and biodiesel industries.
 
In a separate study, the same researchers have reported that biodiesel waste can be used for brick manufacture, thus increasing insulation capacity by 40 percent.

 
 
"Adding waste means that the end product has low thermal conductivity and is therefore a good insulator," explains Carmen Martínez, researcher at the University of Jaen. "In addition to the resulting benefit of using these bricks instead of their traditional counterparts made of traditional raw materials." Another of the advantages of adding waste to the brick prototypes is that they provide energy due to their organic material content. This could help to reduce fuel consumption and kiln time required for brick production. At the moment the prototype's dimensions are small (3 x 1 x 6 cm). But the team has already tested larger bricks and the results are similar. "On the whole, this technique could bring about a saving in energy and raw materials for brick factories along with environmental benefits from the use of waste that is initially discarded," adds Martínez. The researcher recognises, however, that the 'Achilles heel' of these bricks is their lower mechanical resistance compared to traditional bricks, although this parameter is above the legal minimum. There are still a few problems to solve in the adherence and shaping of those pieces that have high percentages of paper waste. The team continues in their search for the happy medium between sustainability and material resistance and is still researching the advantages of adding other products, such as sludge from water treatment plants or residues from the beer, olive and biodiesel industries. In the Fuel Processing Technology journal itself, the researchers have published another study confirming that biodiesel waste can be used for brick manufacture, thus increasing insulation capacity by 40%. More information: Carmen Martínez, Teresa Cotes, Francisco A. Corpas. "Recovering wastes from the paper industry: Development of ceramic materials". D. Eliche-Quesada, S. Martínez-Martínez, L. Pérez-Villarejo, F. J. Iglesias-Godino, C. Martínez-García, F.A. Corpas-Iglesias. "Valorizationof biodiesel production residues in making porous clay brick". Fuel Processing Technology 103, 2012. Doi: 10.1016/j.fuproc.2011.10.017 and 10.1016/j.fuproc.2011.11.013 Provided by Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT) search and more info

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-paper-bricks.html#jCp

   

Tagged categories: Brick; Construction; Insulation; Recycled building materials; Research

Comment from Catherine Brooks, (1/30/2013, 2:36 PM)

I read about a man in Africa who has developed bricks from the waste beef blood from processing plants. The bricks do not require high heat ovens to bind them. Another great benefit is the creation of jobs in underdeveloped countries.


Comment from Catherine Brooks, (1/30/2013, 2:36 PM)

I read about a man in Africa who has developed bricks from the waste beef blood from processing plants. The bricks do not require high heat ovens to bind them. Another great benefit is the creation of jobs in underdeveloped countries.


Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.

KTA-Tator, Inc. - Corporate Office
KTA Inspection Services

Determine Specification Compliance:
• Surface Preparation
• Moisture Content
• Paint Materials & Application
• Aesthetics
Contact:
Kevin Brown, 336-874-2651
Corporate:
1-800-245-6379 x208


Garland Company
Quick Fix to Ponding Water on Roofs

Quick-Slope™ is a modified acrylic cementitious material developed to add slope and provide water dispersion over roof systems.


AGC Chemicals
Film Museum Gets a beautiful FEVE Resin Facelift

LUMIFLON based coatings can last up to 30 years without fading, offering a low-maintenance solution that retains color and gloss and can be field-applied.


Keim Mineral Coatings
Translucent concrete stains for new and old concrete

Penetrating, translucent mineral silicate stains harmonize uneven concrete color and blend patches and repairs, without the "painted" look. Will never peel.


Dumond Chemicals Inc.
Peel Away®1 Heavy Duty Paint Remover

has been the #1 Choice of Professionals who perform Historic Restoration and Lead Paint Abatement for over 25 years. Peel Away®1 is an eco-safe method for removing up to 30 Coats of oil-based lead paints in a single application.


Chicago Corrosion Group

Rust Buddy Solidifier

Stops Rust With A Brushstroke.
No Surface Prep Required.


Armorthane
Best Floor Coatings with Maximum Durability

Coat CONCRETE or WOOD flooring for wheel and foot traffic, chemical resistance, weather-proofing, indoors and outside. Variety of textures for beauty, resilience and safety.


Atlas Material Testing Technology

Helping You Put Your Products To The Test

• Outdoor Accelerated
Weathering
• Laboratory Testing
Services
• Accelerated Weathering
Instruments

www.atlas-mts.com atlas.info@ametek.com

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 2100 Wharton Street, Suite 310, Pittsburgh PA 15203-1951

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@durabilityanddesign.com


The Technology Publishing Network

Durability + Design PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 

© Copyright 2012-2015, Technology Publishing Co., All rights reserved