Durability + Design
Follow us on Twitter Follow us on LinkedIn Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram Visit the TPC Store
Search the site

 

D+D News

Main News Page


Glass-Bottom Bridge a Terrifying Thrill

Friday, November 14, 2014

More items for Color + Design

Comment | More

A new glass floor designed like a "big, gaping hole" in London's storied Tower Bridge is offering visitors a heart-stopping view of the city from nearly 140 feet up.

The floor, 42 meters above the River Thames, is 11 meters long by 1.8 meters wide (36 feet long by six feet wide); each of the six glass panels weighs 530 kilograms (1,168 pounds), according to the Tower Bridge Exhibition.

Tower Bridge glass floor
Screen grab via TowerBridge.org.uk

One of the main objectives of the glass floor project was to make "it look as real as possible ... a big gaping hole in the floor," said Chris Earlie, head of the Tower Bridge Exhibition.

The glass floor was unveiled Monday (Nov. 10) on the bridge's west walkway. The east walkway will open a glass floor on Dec. 1.

The £1 million ($1.58 million USD) project was funded by the City of London Corporation and the Bridge House Estates.

120-Year-Old Bridge

One of London's most popular attractions, the 120-year-old bridge took eight years to build. It is a combined bascule and suspension bridge.

Its high-level walkways were designed so that people could still cross the bridge when it was raised. In fact, visitors can now watch the bridge raising below their feet.

The glass floor is 11 meters long and 1.8 meters wide (36 feet long by six feet wide). Each of the six glass panels weighs 530 kilograms (1,168 pounds).

The bridge opens 1,000 times each year for ships to pass through, according to BBC.com.

'A Big Gaping Hole'

"There is that sense of trepidation," Chris Earlie, head of the Tower Bridge Exhibition, told TheGuardian.com. "It is more exciting, I think, because you are not actually that high; you can see everything in detail beneath you.

"I do a lot of climbing and adventure sports but, even for me, the first time was a bit difficult."

TowerBridge
Creative Commons / Cmglee

The tall ship Wylde Swan passes under Tower Bridge as decorated for the London Olympics in August 2012. (Note the Olympic rings folded up to allow passage of the mast.) A new glass floor in the walkway 138 feet up allows visitors a view looking straight down.

Earlie added that one of the main objectives was to make "it look as real as possible ... a big, gaping hole in the floor."

And for those not thrilled at the too-realistic empty space under their feet, bridge officials recommend the bridge's "stunning panoramic views of London"—available to all by looking out, not down.

   

Tagged categories: Architecture; Bridges; Design; Glass; Project Management

Comment Join the Conversation:

Sign in to our community to add your comments.

Advertisements
 
Digital Facilities Corporation
 
Manage Wall Systems with
FM-Pro
 
FM-Pro™ is designed with a comprehensive wall asset area module to inventory and manage Wall systems, including fenestration details, and is suited for building owners, façade area consultants, and product suppliers.
 

 
PPG Paints
 
PPG PAINTS™ SPEEDHIDE® INTERIOR LATEX
 
This high-hiding, low-VOC, low-odor paint enables a space to be painted while occupied and delivers the durable product performance professionals require.
 

 
 
 

Technology Publishing Co., 1501 Reedsdale Street, Suite 2008, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

TEL 1-412-431-8300  • FAX  1-412-431-5428  •  EMAIL webmaster@durabilityanddesign.com


The Technology Publishing Network

Durability + Design PaintSquare the Journal of Protective Coatings & Linings Paint BidTracker

 

© Copyright 2012-2018, Technology Publishing Co., All rights reserved